Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Visiting The Isle Of Wight.

In September, while visiting London,
my daughter, Suzanne and I took a day 
to visit the Isle Of Wight,
A small Island on the South tip of England,
a place of our roots.

My Great Great Grandfather, was born 
on this Island and came to America in 1767.
More about him at the end of this blog.

We left London very early in the morning.
It took us most of the morning to get there.
We took the subway and 3 trains from London, 
to Portsmouth.
We did take a wrong connection somewhere, 
 which lengthened our ride,
 and to make matters worst, 
when we arrived at the Ferry Dock,
 we were told we had the wrong tickets. 
Our tickets were for a Hovercraft
crossing to the Island, not the Ferry.
(The person who sold us the tickets back in London
did not tell us about a "Hovercraft".)
So we had to take a bus around Portsmouth to
another dock to get the Hovercraft.

The Isle of Wight is about 2 miles of the coast of England.

"Please note that there are bus services
 directly from Heathrow Airport and 
other points in London,
 to The Isle Of Wight."
Our hotel being near EarlCourt Subway,
is why we chose the subway and
train route.


It was the first time I had seen a Hovercraft.
It was a bit scary to see this huge apparatus,
 arrive right up on the sand, 
turn around, and deflate,
Apparently,  this is the world's only 
passenger Hovercraft service.


We board in the front of the Hovercraft

I said a silent prayer before  boarding


Comfortable seats inside.
Controls up above.
The look on Suzanne's face,
says it all. (excitement)

We couldn't see much through the window, 
the salt water mist.
In 10 minutes, we landed on 
The Isle of Wight.
Our first time ever visiting this beautiful Island.
The shores of England in the distance.


At the train station nearby, 
we waited for our train to the
  seaside town of Shanklin,

"Mind The Gap"
is a common sight in London at all the
subway/underground tracks.

And here it comes.

An Antique Train.


It made me think of  The Polar Express.
The same sound and speed rolling over the tracks.
It may be antique, but it sure has speed. 
Apparently they are London's old subway cars recycled.


As you can see, we had our choice of seats.
It was more crowded when we returned.


We enjoyed the ride though beautiful countryside to Shanklin.

A change from the packed subways and the busy city of London. 



At Shanklin we walked towards a beach café and 
 stopped for lunch.


Below, I came overdressed.
It was much cooler in London.
I had to buy a scarf and gloves
for the cooler mornings there.


We visited the beautiful beach.



This waterfront was damaged by Nazi bombs during the war.




We met a nice lady, Heather
who visits the Island each Summer.
She lives near London and
drives her car, takes the ferry
across, and stays at an Inn, nearby.


Some of the lodgings and restaurant along the beach. 


A Menu and "We welcome Ankle biters"
Pets are welcome.


We took a walk to visit the town.









"Jingle Bells" the perfect name
for a Christmas Store.


Of course, I had to go inside.

We visited the Shanklin Chine Gardens.



With it's beautiful tropical vegetation,


 Along a gorge.




An Aviary.



We were surprised at all the Tropical vegetation
and the warmer climate.

Waterfall


Fisherman's Cottage Pub





Royal Marine Commando
1942-46
"In Memory Of Our Comrades
Who Remain On Foreign Fields"

During the war Shanklin Chine was taken over 
by the Royal Marine Commandos.
They trained here and prepared for the 
Dieppe raid of 1942. 
This is a plaque dedicated to their memory. 

Also on the Island, 
"Pluto",  the famous pipeline under the ocean, built
to carry petrol/fuel  to the Allied Troops in France,
to supply their tanks and vehicles.


2 Day's names, listed here.
AE Day age 36, at sea and
R Day, age 22, Italy.
We returned to the beach and did some beachcombing.


Seaglass and stones, 
"Little pieces of the Island"
that I was able to bring home.
The circle on the right, is part of a bottle neck.
By it's condition, it has been many many yrs in the sea.
Suzanne's Treasures.
It's the first time we see a pure white snail shell.
An albino?


In the late afternoon,
we left the Island, and
 started our long journey back to London.
We arrived back at our hotel 
exhausted and exhilarated.
A day to remember!





Our Roots on the Island.
Unfortunately we didn't have more time
 to do search on our genealogy.  
We're hoping to return one day,
  stay longer, and visit all the Island.

My Great Great Grandfather,
James Day Esq., was born on this Island,
in 1767. He came to Canada at 24yrs. old
and became a Master Shipbuilder
for Robin, Jones and Whitman, 
entrepreneurs from the Isle of Jersey. 
They dominated the cod fishery of 
the Bay des Chaleur, 
in Eastern Quebec, Canada,
 from 1766 to 1825,
surviving piracy on the Atlantic and
suffering occupation during the
American Revolution. 

James Day Esq.


The photos below, are taken from a Museum in
Paspebiac, Quebec, Canada.
"Site Historique du Banc-de-Peche de Paspébiac."




Ships Names

Some paintings of his ships.
Painted by "Philip John Ouless" a Marine painter.








His ships delivered shipments to many ports along the Atlantic.



A history book 

I have photos of all James' ships except 
his first one, mentioned in this article,
"The Fiott"
The first vessel launched by Robin Jones and Company.


The Museum in Paspebiac.
Annie, Martin, Sabrina, Mathieu, Suzanne,
and of course Pinot...July 2018.
Inside the Museum
The goods were transported in barrels, made here.


Thanks for visiting my blog xo.
All photos taken my Suzanne and myself.


Visit other sites we saw while in London:


To view my blog on my collection of seaglass, click here.

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